Pure Ochre (by Yarn)

Brush-tail Possum Beach Towel

119 reviews
$39.95

or 4 payments of $9.98 AUD  More info

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Pure Ochre is:

  • 100% Authentic Indigenous artwork
  • Ethically & sustainably sourced Indigenous art
  • Supports Indigenous employment & training
Brighten up your next beach trip with Pure Ochre’s brand new Beach Towels! They come in a gorgeous range of sublimated designs by Warlukurlangu Artists. These towels feature a super absorbent 100% cotton backing, perfect for all of your swimming adventures.

Product: Beach Towel
Materials: Polyester front and cotton back
Washing: Warm machine wash with regular detergent. Do not use fabric softener. Only wash after a couple of uses. Rinse towels after being used poolside to remove the chlorine residue that can fade colours.
Dimensions: 75cm x 150cm
Story: Brush-tail Possum
Artist: Pamela Napurrurla Walker
Janganpa Jukurrpa (Brush-tail Possum Dreaming)- Mawurrji

Janganpa Jukurrpa (common brush-tail possum [Trichosurus vulpecula] Dreaming) travels all over Warlpiri country. ‘Janganpa’ are nocturnal animals that often nest in the hollows of white gum trees (‘wapunungka’). This story comes from a big hill called Mawurrji, west of Yuendumu and north of Pikilyi (Vaughan Springs). A group of ‘janganpa’ ancestors resided there. Every night they would go out in search of food. Their hunting trips took them to Wirlki and Wanapirdi, where they found ‘pamapardu’ (flying ants). They journeyed on to Ngarlkirdipini looking for water. A Nampijinpa women was living at Mawurrji with her two daughters. She gave her daughters in marriage to a Jupurrurla ‘janganpa’ but later decided to run away with them. The Jupurrurla angrily pursued the woman. He tracked them to Mawurrji where he killed them with a stone axe. Their bodies are now rocks at this place. Warlpiri people perform a young men’s initiation ceremony, which involves the Janganpa Jukurrpa. The Janganpa Jukurrpa belongs to Jakamarra/Jupurrurla men and Nakamarra/Napurrurla women. In Warlpiri paintings traditional iconography is used to represent this Jukurrpa. ‘Janganpa’ tracks are often represented as ‘E’ shaped figures and concentric circles are used to depict the trees in which the ‘janganpa’ live, and also the sites at Mawurrji.

Will leave the warehouse within 1-2 business days.

Standard Shipping: $6.95
Express Shipping: $14.95
*Free Standard Shipping: Spend over $150
*Free Express Shipping: Spend over $250

Free Returns within 45 days after delivery.
Just download your free returns postage label in our returns portal, print it and send your item back.

COVID-19 UPDATE: Australia Post has been experiencing some delays in these uncertain times, but are doing their best to ship your orders to you in time. We thank you for your patience!

You can find more information about Shipping and Returns here.

Customer Reviews
5.0 Based on 119 Reviews
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Filter Reviews:
VS
12/31/2021
Vanessa S.
Australia Australia

Thanks!

Lighter weight, absorbent beach towel that folds small for the beach bag. Beautiful artwork and colours. My 8yr old is very taken with it

A
12/30/2021
Aileen
Australia Australia

Hammerhead good!

The best towel on the market!

SW
12/30/2021
Suzy W.
Australia Australia

Finally the perfect towel

Wonderful. The towel not only looks beautiful, it is light weight, absorbent and quick to dry! I love it!!

IY
12/30/2021
Isis Y.
Australia Australia

Great christmas gift!

I bought this towel for my partners mother and I was very impressed with the quality of it. She loved the design and was very happy with her christmas gift!

EK
12/28/2021
Elizabeth K.
Australia Australia

Eye-catchingly beautiful

Love the towel, it’s so pretty. It’s lovely and soft, too. So glad I treated myself.

MEET THE ARTIST

Pamela Napurrurla Walker

Aboriginal Warlpiri woman

Pamela has been working with Warlukurlangu Artists Aboriginal Corporation since 1994 but it wasn’t until 2006 that she began to paint full time. She paints her father’s Jukurrpa, Dreamings, which relate directly to her land, its features and the plants and animals that inhabit it.